Mental Health Matters

At the risk of repeating myself, I started this blog to share my experience of depression in the hope that it would help others. I worked for more than 20 years in the NHS for a large mental health Trust and although I haven’t blogged much about it recently mental health is still a subject about which I care deeply. Last week there was a story in The Times which alarmed me about the way mental health is supported, and which I felt I had to share. This post is about the situation in England but I suspect that the issues are common to many other countries around the world.

A little bit of background: when the Tory-led coalition government came to power in 2010 they embarked on a major restructuring of the NHS. There had been no mention of this in their manifesto, but that’s another story. One of the key changes was the creation of Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) which were intended to put the power in commissioning health services into the hands of health practitioners (largely, General Practitioners, i.e. GPs) as this would, in theory, mean that those who knew best would be commissioning the services needed by their local population. There is an ongoing debate about how effective this has been and a range of other issues too, but I’m not going there. What interests me at present is this:

Copyright Times Newspapers' Click to enlarge
Copyright Times Newspapers. Click to enlarge

Apart from the fact that they are going against Government policy and misusing their funding, I am horrified that so many CCGs fail to see the importance of providing good mental health services. These are supposed to be the experts, those who know best. It beggars belief that they can be so ignorant. The Times commented further on this in their editorial section:

Copyright Times Newspapers. Click to enlarge
Copyright Times Newspapers. Click to enlarge

I’m with them 100%. The figures speak volumes, both in terms of the abuse of power these CCGs are engaged in, and of the pressing need for more investment to be made in mental health services. I started working in mental health in 1993 and even then it was recognised by many to be a Cinderella service, pushed into a corner and under-supported. And children’s mental health services were seen as the poor relations within that! Finally, it seemed, we had a government that was doing more than say nice words about this, but they are being let down by the very people who they thought would be best qualified to enact their wishes.

There have been many studies which have shown how good mental health can be of benefit to physical health, and vice versa. One of the problems in these days of evidence-based treatment is in measuring the effectiveness of mental health care. With a physical illness it is relatively easy to assess, likewise with injuries, such as broken limbs: there is clearly visible evidence available in such cases. But this is not always true of mental illness. To use my own case as an example, the diagnosis I was given nearly five years ago was treated, I returned to work until I retired, and since then I have not felt any recurrence of the original symptoms. So, does that mean I am a successfully treated case? Probably, as I’m no longer costing my local CCG anything for treatment, but who is to say that I am ‘cured’ or whether that is even possible? And does that mean that my local CCG shouldn’t spend the money it has been given to treat people like me on people like me, that it can choose to use it for other treatments? I think not!

People with mental illnesses have for far too long been discriminated against and stigmatised. Whilst this may be recognised by some, far too little can be done, both in terms of treatment and education, as the funding just isn’t available to do all that is needed. I know that the NHS in general is underfunded and that CCGs are under severe pressure to balance their books, as are provider services, but to take money away from the most needy part of the service is totally unacceptable, particularly when that money is supposed to have been ring-fenced for those services. Are the CCGs deciding on their service commissioning on the basis of discrimination and stigmatisation? Who can say, but it could be argued that they are showing signs of doing this. If the supposed experts don’t take mental health seriously, what hope is there that the general population can come to recognise the need to do so?

(Footnote: I am having a week of mental health awareness posts. This is my second, after yesterday’s reblogging of It Asda Be from three years ago. More is to come.)

 

90 thoughts on “Mental Health Matters

  1. Clive October 10, 2017 / 10:40 pm

    Reblogged this on Take It Easy and commented:

    I wasn’t planning on posting for World Mental Health Day today, but rather late in the day have decided to share again this post from September 2016. This has become, by a distance, the most ‘liked’ of all of my posts and, reading through the comments for the first time in ages it is clear that it touched a chord with many people. So, for those who haven’t seen it before, here is a second chance to catch up with it.

    The post was prompted by my horror at the reports that service commissioners in England were diverting money supposedly ring-fenced for mental health services into other services. In the year since then, the situation does not appear to have improved, and I have seen no evidence that mental health is any higher in the commissioners’ priorities. I find this scandalous, and hope that the Government can find time in its busy agenda of wrecking the country to deliver on the commitments they have made to improve mental health services. I saw last week an estimate that an additional 10,000 mental health practitioners are needed across the country, and that specialist Mental Health Trusts in London currently have 25% vacancy rates, or worse. Urgent action is needed to begin rectifying this, as even a start now will take years to filter through as improved services.

    On a personal note, I know that despite my own treatment finishing four years ago, I am never far from tipping over the edge and needing help again. I was well looked after, up to a point, and the final piece of the jigsaw was provided by my employer’s Occupational Health Service – I worked for an NHS Mental Health Trust at the time. I have since retired, so that is no longer available to me, and I know that local services where I live are limited. The prospect of needing their support again worries me, not because I don’t have confidence in their skills, but because they are under huge pressure and depression – which I had – isn’t exactly a high priority in the great scheme of things.

    I hope you can take a few moments to read my original post. Whilst it isn’t themed for WMHD it raises important issues. We shouldn’t allow these to be swept under the carpet.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC October 10, 2017 / 11:34 pm

      Good for you for reblogging, Clive. I have linked it to October 2017’s Mental Health Calendar – and it will remain linked each year I do these, as long as the link works.

      October 5th was National Depression Screening Day – if you have something appropriate for that as well, jump over and leave me a link in my comment section and I will move it up into the calendar post itself.
      xx,
      mgh
      (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
      ADD/EFD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
      “It takes a village to transform a world!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Clive October 10, 2017 / 11:43 pm

        Many thanks, much appreciated. I won’t be taking the post down – for someone who usually gets around 20 likes per post that one is far too successful to remove, and it’s very important to me as a subject. Could I be very picky and ask you to make a small edit to your link please? You said it was politicians diverting the funding, but it’s actually the Clinical Commissioning Groups doing it – they are led by doctors which to me makes it a far worse crime! I hope you don’t think me rude in asking!

        I’m not sure that I have anything that would work for Depression Screening Day, apart from my original set of three ‘ My Story’ posts, and I’m not really sure that they would work for it. I’ll look through the rest though, in case I have something that would help you.

        Many thanks for your support xx

        Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC October 11, 2017 / 7:35 am

        Support, always, Chuck. And I will make the edit in the morning (2:30 AM here now).

        Would “doctor-led Clinical Commissioning Groups” be okay, since many readers won’t know what it is or why it matters otherwise?
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive October 11, 2017 / 8:08 pm

        Sorry, this was dropped into my spam box for some reason and I’ve only just found it. Your suggestion is fine, many thanks for taking it on board.

        Who’s Chuck, by the way? 😂 xx

        Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC October 11, 2017 / 9:34 pm

        Bigtime rushing oops – please forgive me. An earlier comment volley must have had his name embroidered on my typing fingers – “huck” came out unconsciously after I typed the “C.” A bit tired, I didn’t proof carefully before I hit send, my attention more on your request. I’m truly sorry.

        Does it get me out of the doghouse that your requested edit is now made?
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive October 11, 2017 / 9:36 pm

        No worries, easily done! Thanks for making the edit, and you were never in the doghouse: I thought it was funny xx

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive October 11, 2017 / 10:33 pm

        It’s easily done. It’s happened to me before and I’ve done it to someone. In my case, I just blame age 😂 xx

        Like

  2. goalliedathletes February 21, 2017 / 1:10 am

    I very much appreciate your thoughts on mental health, specifically how psychological health cannot be measured in concrete terms compared to physical health. I think that we often forget how the two are tied together–how the symptoms of one’s mental health disorder may interfere with healthy behaviors. Thank you for sharing!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Lucy Blackall February 20, 2017 / 2:29 pm

    I mean this in the most respectful way, but it is delightful to see someone of your generation caring about mental health.

    Many people do not understand it, and it has only recently become something that (I personally have noticed) is being taken slightly more seriously that it was previously. I was just searching for fellow bloggers who were posting about this, so I could get a better idea on what peoples views were and what people wrote about and its been inspiring to see so many of us are ‘aware’ and do ‘care’ about this.

    Thank you for your post, and I will be following you from now on as I really admire what you said! 🙂 Thank you

    Liked by 2 people

    • Clive February 20, 2017 / 7:02 pm

      Thanks Lucy, both for your kind comments and for following. I’ll return the compliment. As you’ll see here, I worked in mental health for 20 years and have been a service user. Naturally, it is a cause close to my heart!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC October 10, 2017 / 11:42 pm

      Interesting comment, Lucy. As a Boomer, I could say the same thing about your generation. The sad truth is that far too few people of ANY age give appropriate consideration to the importance of mental health – and politicians are some of the least educated about it.

      I’ve been fighting this reality for over 25 years now, hoping to see positive change in my lifetime. My entire blog is mental health related – brain-based self-help (with a few lighter, fluffier posts from time to time for a bit of a break). Six years now, and still going strong. I’ll be over soon to see what YOU have to say about the topic.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  4. Laura Black February 20, 2017 / 8:20 am

    Thank you for sharing this insightful and articulate post. It is so important that we all keep talking about these issues and highlighting where the NHS is letting people down. I am very fortunate to live in an area with relatively good provision, but I also know it’s a post code lottery. A friend just 20 miles away gets no support at all from her local CMHT. That’s just plain wrong to me. Laura

    Liked by 2 people

    • Clive February 20, 2017 / 11:25 am

      Thanks for your kind words. I too was well supported – up to a point! What worries me about the postcode lottery is that the people who should be buying the tickets are using the money to fund other services, for easier ‘wins.’ We need to keep saying this till they get it right.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. shannonbrunskill February 20, 2017 / 2:11 am

    WOW, I really wish that people who needed help for such things could find it. And that government officials understood the importance in education about and treatment of mental illness. I will say that there are several studies going on right now (one at oxford I believe) tieing mental health with digestive system health. You can google “gut brain” to read about the studies, but I agree, it is difficult to quantify mental health improvement or decline. I’m with you education and treatment.

    http://www.essentialoilsgangsta.com

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive February 20, 2017 / 11:27 am

      The trouble appears to me to be that it is easy for governments to say the right words, but they really don’t have a clue about how to put them into any form of co-ordinated action. This is a multi-service problem, but the dots aren’t being joined up.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. 13hales February 17, 2017 / 9:11 pm

    Thanks for your blog. Many people suffer with mental health issues. You will help a lot of people.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive February 18, 2017 / 1:00 pm

      Thank you, very kind of you to say so 😊

      Like

      • 13hales February 19, 2017 / 9:11 am

        You’re welcome!

        Like

    • Clive February 12, 2017 / 9:42 am

      Thank you, I’m pleased you find this helpful. Take care.

      Like

  7. liloangela February 11, 2017 / 11:36 am

    brilliant! coincidentally, there was a man in our local hometown mall who committed suicide around 10 am today. I think suicide is 100% preventable only if many more people become aware of mental health as an issue.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Clive February 11, 2017 / 12:48 pm

      Thank you. Sad to hear that news, and you’re right – better education is vital to improving mental health and understanding of the issues around it. Thanks for reading.

      Like

    • Clive February 9, 2017 / 1:59 pm

      Thank you so much. Very kind of you to say that!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. yugenblog February 8, 2017 / 8:47 pm

    I love this post! I started my blog because i found writing was a coping method to soothe my anxiety and depression. It’s good to see more people are speaking of mental illness and taking it seriously!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive February 9, 2017 / 2:01 pm

      Many thanks, I’m glad you liked it. It’s why I started my blog, and I occasionally get back to it1

      Liked by 1 person

  9. sana538 February 4, 2017 / 4:51 pm

    Loving this post this is very important to me mental Health does matter to me because without it one day we could fail we can’t just physically be fine but mentally as well we need to take care of ourself as much as we could thank you for this 🙌🏼🙌🏼🙌🏼

    Do check out my blog posts I’m new to this blogging world would love to know what you think 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive February 5, 2017 / 11:49 am

      Thanks for your kind words. I couldn’t agree more with you on the need for good mental health. I’ll take a look at your blog – always good to see people joining in 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  10. becky91093 January 30, 2017 / 7:51 pm

    This was really interesting to read, and coincidentally I’ve just written a post about the new plans to invest more in youth mental health! I work on a study which is trying to improve mental health for young people in the UK, and its great to read posts that people like yourselves are writing to raise awareness of current issues.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Clive January 30, 2017 / 8:22 pm

      Thanks for your kind words. Having both worked for an NHS Trust that provides mental health services and having had my own problems, this is a subject dear to my heart!

      Like

  11. addwillms20 January 22, 2017 / 1:54 pm

    This is so interesting to read Clive, thank you for writing and sharing this. I have also suffered mental health and I hope this stigma attached to it will soon be reduced, it needs me so people can receive more help. Thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive January 22, 2017 / 6:48 pm

      Thanks for your kind words, and for following. You’re right, removing the stigma would help so many people.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Natural Health January 22, 2017 / 11:07 am

    Thanks for your post,
    I feel mental illness like depression can be a normal results of not following your hearts desires. What i mean is, quite often in todays modern cultures people are no longer living on their own terms and conditions, they’re living life through a system that they were born into. For example Im from the UK my culture would have me get a 9-5 and then a family then house. Whose to say there is one to live. This is very broadly speaking but can be applied for the little things. I think culture has its place but as an individual we should be thinking for ourselves because we are the only ones who know what is best for us.

    With regards to addressing an illness I feel one area that is over looked is diet and overall physical health. Like you said physical activity really plays its part in the recovery process. Im refering more towards Gut health, Liver and kidney health. these systems are overlooked as we our culture does not promote looking at the body and mind as one but more like the way a mechanic would look at a car. For example If you have a skin issue like spots or a rash your doctor would give you cream.

    The cream is a chemical and we are natural. everything we put in the skin will end up in the body.

    The skin is used by the body to excrete toxins, especially if the liver and kidneys are over taxed.

    We should be looking to promote health in every area of our body not just one as the mind extends through the body via the CNS and blood. The body and mind are one of the same.

    With regards to money and the nhs I have recently spent a week there and that was long enough to see that it is a low priority for our government even though the NHS is meant to be paid for through our taxes? (i may be wrong here).
    Its easy for the people to see what their government really cares about when you see for yourself. And dont listen to the lack of funds story. We are the people of the country / world and we deserve our health ( & freedom 😛 )

    Thanks for your post my friend
    Kindest
    Natural Health

    Like

  13. nicolemerriman January 20, 2017 / 2:22 pm

    Completely agree. I recently started blogging for pretty much the same reason. The stigma attached makes it so difficult for people to seek help and often results in them feeling isolated or strange. I feel like a lot of people now are using the term depression willy nilly whenever they feel a bit down, without genuine diagnoses. I find this is also making it harder for legitimate sufferers to come forward because they feel they won’t be taken seriously or will be labeled as attention seekers.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Clive January 21, 2017 / 2:30 pm

      Thanks for reading and commenting. I agree – if we could somehow find a way to de-stigmatise mental health issues it would be much easier for people to get the help and support they need. As long as it is provided in the first place!

      Like

  14. Liam Thompson January 10, 2017 / 7:01 pm

    Could not agree more, mental health needs focus and in no way should be at the back of the queue, or the bottom of the pile. The only answer? To help each other and not ignore or be put off by this problem

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive January 11, 2017 / 5:36 pm

      There needs to be a huge shift in public understanding of mental health problems, together with an end to it being treated as the poor relation of health services. Until then, we can but hope….

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Hello there 👋🏽 November 26, 2016 / 4:18 am

    I think the mental health support network sucks, doesn’t matter where you live. There’s either no help at all or very little at all.. this definitely has to change as our hospitals don’t even know what to do with mentally I’ll patients as they aren’t ‘trained’ and that includes doctors to! I also think everyone should make an issue about how this can be changed without being judged or criticised for expressing our opinions.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive November 26, 2016 / 8:34 am

      You’ve clearly not been well supported. I was lucky to have a good GP and the local mental health team were good too. But specialist help was hard to come by, the waiting list was so long! There needs to be a real commitment made to improve mental health services and to provide sufficient funding for this, and for training and all the resources required for this to work.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hello there 👋🏽 November 26, 2016 / 9:28 am

        No I haven’t been supported well at all. There should definitely be changes to system in next year or two because the ‘problem’ is getting worse, as now children are getting diagnosed with a mental illness and that’s not right…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive November 26, 2016 / 9:41 am

        I’m sorry to hear it and hope things improve for you. You’re right about big improvements being needed. Sadly, children have been diagnosed with mental health problems for many years. As well as being a sufferer myself I also started working for a service provider in 1993 and there was a well-established child and adolescent service back then.It was still the poor relation in an under-funded service though, even in those days.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Hello there 👋🏽 November 26, 2016 / 11:16 am

        Thinks will improve in time.. people need to learn to understand what mental health does to people, rather then just guessing on how your ‘feeling’.. more support, councillors, mental health doctors etc should be trained more and learn more about the illnesses… there’s not even many charities to donate to that covers mental health either which is a right shame.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive November 26, 2016 / 12:54 pm

        The will needs to be there amongst the powers that be. You mention charities: have you tried Mind or Rethink? There’s also the Time to Change initiative – there’s help there if you can find it. I hope you can.

        Liked by 1 person

  16. wecanbeanythingblog November 12, 2016 / 12:08 am

    The thing that scares me most is the stigma of coming out and telling people. I also believe that men such as myself have a tougher time (although strictly internal) letting these things out in fear of society deeming us less of a man. I think we need to “man” up and tell people what is really wrong to allow some of this pressure to be released. I also feel that telling our story is a great strength as this shows people that we are not alone.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Clive November 12, 2016 / 8:06 am

      Being honest with yourself is the first step towards dealing with your problem, as I’ve also said in a number of other posts, so I agree with you wholeheartedly. There is plenty of research that backs up your point that men find this harder to do, probably for the reasons you suggest. But when we are feeling at out lowest this isn’t easy for us to do, is it? I applaud anyone who has come to terms with it and taken that first step. Once you do, you find those who genuinely care for you and will support you.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. kelleysdiy October 31, 2016 / 5:28 pm

    Here in the Coachella Valley, we have had no mental health facilities. Finally, we are getting help for the people who are depressed and anxious. So many people need help…someone to listen…I am so glad they are finally are helping people.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive October 31, 2016 / 5:32 pm

      That’s why we hang onto our National Health Service. For all its faults it is far better than a system that depends on what people can afford, or what others think they can profit from. I’m glad to hear that they are starting to provide treatment for those who need it, sounds like it was long overdue! And thank you for following my blog 😊

      Liked by 1 person

      • kelleysdiy October 31, 2016 / 6:07 pm

        Yes it was….decades.

        Liked by 1 person

      • kelleysdiy October 31, 2016 / 6:17 pm

        I am sure it will be a blessing to alot of people!!

        Liked by 1 person

  18. warriorprincesscait October 11, 2016 / 7:23 am

    Wonderful. It was well written and I can tell you truly understand the system. As a consumer/provider myself, I appreciate this post. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive October 11, 2016 / 7:55 am

      Many thanks for your kind words. Glad you appreciated it 😊

      Liked by 1 person

      • warriorprincesscait October 11, 2016 / 8:11 am

        I’ve written two successive pieces on medication for mental illness. From the stigma surrounding taking it, to my second piece about the side effects, cost and ease of accessibility to medication. All huge issues these days.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Clive October 11, 2016 / 8:23 am

        They are indeed, and far too few people are afraid to face up to them. Thank you for following my blog, I’ve returned the compliment and have been looking at some of your posts. Your writing is amazing! Good luck with all that you are facing, stay strong and brave – because that’s what you are.

        Liked by 1 person

      • warriorprincesscait October 11, 2016 / 8:26 am

        Thank you so much! 🙂 I look forward to more wonderful posts from you in the future! 🙂 Glad to see awareness being raised!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive October 11, 2016 / 8:43 am

        I started this blog four years ago to share my experience of depression, but have rather neglected the mental health theme of late. I’m making a conscious effort to do better! But there will still be other ramblings too. Thanks for your support, it’s much appreciated.

        Liked by 1 person

      • warriorprincesscait October 11, 2016 / 8:46 am

        We write about where our heart and our mind is. You never need to apologize for writing or not writing something. We each write what we can, when we can. This is your space, do you, Clive! :p

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive October 11, 2016 / 8:52 am

        But I did feel guilty! Thanks, you’ll see that I write about what I feel, believe or just want to rant about. I’m planning to do more on music too, as that has always been important to me. Support from fellow bloggers keeps me – and all of us – going 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive October 11, 2016 / 8:25 am

        Thanks for these links, I’ll follow them up.

        Liked by 1 person

  19. joanneeddy September 29, 2016 / 3:04 am

    Clive, this is appalling and unfortunately all too common. Over here, Obama tried to address equity of mental health and physical health treatment with the Affordable Care Program, which I’m sure you know is controversial. We keep trying to get to parity, but we will have to see what happens in our election to see what happens next. Good blog, Clive, worth doing! Jo

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive September 29, 2016 / 8:09 am

      Thanks Jo, I appreciate your support. The opposition to Obama’s healthcare plans has been reported over here, hopefully your election will bring the right result for this.

      Liked by 1 person

      • joanneeddy September 29, 2016 / 2:57 pm

        Thanks, Clive, yes for that and lots of other reasons 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive September 29, 2016 / 2:59 pm

        Like the world still existing in five years’ time? Exactly! 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • joanneeddy September 29, 2016 / 3:01 pm

        I know. At times, I just shake my head wondering how anyone can miss who he really is…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive September 29, 2016 / 3:06 pm

        That’s the view from everywhere else, I think. We can’t believe a whole country could be stupid enough to elect someone like him.

        Liked by 1 person

      • joanneeddy September 29, 2016 / 3:14 pm

        Sadly, it seems to be largely poorer whites, mainly men, who seem to feel all other politicians lie and his are just done for effect, almost embracing his vulgarity as indicating he really is one of them. that this rich, entitled snake oil salesman, PT Barnum, reality show self promoter cares about them. It really does seem more like some extended infomercial than reality at times. I am not so mad at his followers but his party for helping him! (Sorry to rant – but it scares me.)

        Liked by 1 person

      • Clive September 29, 2016 / 3:20 pm

        It scares me too! Those who support him are too stupid to realise that he is using them to his own ends. The only person he cares about is himself. His racist, bigoted, misogynistic words should be a reason not to vote for him, but there seem to be too many who fail to see this.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. browney237 September 29, 2016 / 1:40 am

    Clive,
    Important issue whether its where you are or or where I am in Australia.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive September 29, 2016 / 8:03 am

      Thanks Michael, I’m pretty sure this is a worldwide issue.

      Like

  21. robjodiefilogomo September 28, 2016 / 2:38 pm

    I think it’s important to talk about these issues because they are so important. Just because you can’t see the issues, doesn’t mean they don’t exist!! But it certainly is harder to quantify.
    jodie
    http://www.jtouchofstyle.com

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive September 28, 2016 / 2:45 pm

      Thanks Jodie. It’s why I started this, and I haven’t really been doing it justice of late. You’re absolutely right: it’s a difficult subject and much easier for most people to ignore as there are no obvious signs.

      Like

  22. Still the Lucky Few September 28, 2016 / 1:45 am

    It’s so much easier (and simpler) to address physical health, since physical health is more obvious and not so easily ignored. It’s a case of out-of-sight, out-of-mind. People are perplexed by mental conditions—it takes knowledge and work to address them. So it’s easy to cut them. I guess all we can do is make the mental sphere more obvious. Better education and PR I guess.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Clive September 28, 2016 / 8:02 am

      I agree with you 100%! We can only hope the message is spread as often as possible till all understand it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • 250pounds2forever October 20, 2016 / 11:54 pm

      This is a very important topic to me both professionally and personally. I work in the field have experienced the impacts of this type of scenario, but I have also been digging my own baggage as I move through my weight loss journey. I get so much attention from friends and family about the pounds I’ve lost, but the struggle and work being done beneath the surface is just as vital.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Clive October 21, 2016 / 8:37 am

        Absolutely! Many are afraid of what they can’t see, and it gives mental illness the aura of being something strange and threatening. Thanks for your support and for following. I’ll return the compliment.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Clive September 27, 2016 / 5:12 pm

      It needed to be said 😊

      Like

  23. Stevie Turner September 27, 2016 / 2:53 pm

    Well done for bringing mental health issues to the fore. Keep up the good work.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clive September 27, 2016 / 3:01 pm

      Thanks Stevie. It’s about time I revisited the reason for starting this!

      Liked by 2 people

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