Let’s Work Together – Again

Five years ago today I posted a piece reflecting on a survey of employers’ attitudes towards mental health. Given yesterday’s news that many employers are starting to make staff redundant rather than bear their share of the costs of the extended furlough scheme, this seemed a timely reminder of what I said back then. I’ve edited the original post, to reflect changes to the plans I had at the time: here’s most of what I said back then:

LET’S WORK TOGETHER

A couple of months ago there was a piece in the newspaper, reporting on a survey which had been carried out into the attitudes of company owners and employees towards mental health issues. Specifically, the survey asked about whether stress, anxiety and depression were regarded as valid reasons to take time off work. It also addressed employees’ views of how their employer dealt with such issues. The results weren’t at all surprising to me, but they made for depressing reading.

Around 70% of employers did not think these issues were sufficient cause to be absent from work, despite the fact that around a quarter of them admitted to having problems themselves. 40% of employees said that they would hide the real reason for their absence, fearing that they wouldn’t be believed or that their employer would treat them badly. To those of us who have at some point had mental health issues, and who have been affected by the stigma which they attract, this is a terrifying result. I was incredibly lucky, in that I worked for an NHS Trust which provided mental health services and had a boss and colleagues who were very supportive. Others don’t have these advantages when it comes to dealing with mental health. Too many times we hear of people who are regarded as malingerers, largely due to the ignorance of their employers. It is, I think, natural that physical illness can be more easily dealt with: after all, you can see the effects, whereas mental illnesses are in the brain and only become apparent if there are extreme behaviours as a result. For the great majority, however, the coping mechanism is to attempt to hide it. From personal experience I know how damaging this can be: the longer you try to hide the illness from others, the more you end up hiding it from yourself. The longer you do this, the harder it becomes to recognise that you need help and to do something about finding that help.

I have written before about my own issues – indeed, they were the reason I started this blog in the first place. If you want to know more about me the ‘My Story’ tab in the menu is the place for this, and you will also find many other posts about mental health here. But this post isn’t intended to be about me, although I’m happy to report that by the end of this month there is a very real possibility that I will be completely free of medication, just over four years since I was first prescribed it. I am very aware of the stigma of mental health, and hope that in my small way I can do something with this blog to help break down the walls around mental health. The UK Government has promised to provide better funding for mental health treatments – but they have been saying that for years without anything really happening, so I’m not holding my breath! Where time, money and resources really do need to be spent is in education: I would love to see mental health as a formal part of the school curriculum, rather than it being left to individual schools to do what they can, if they feel so inclined. And we really need to educate employers about the impact of mental health issues on people – after all, in many cases it is those very same employers whose work practices have contributed to people’s mental health issues!

The title for this piece is deliberately chosen. As the song says, ‘every boy, girl, woman and man’ should work together. We are a long way from being a society where mental health is treated fairly, and we should all learn what we can do to help us move towards that.

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And now back to today. Five years on, and I haven’t seen any improvement in government funding and support for mental health. They occasionally repeat the good words, but action doesn’t seem to follow. At present, efforts are – quite rightly – being directed mostly at bringing Covid under control, but if and when that happens I fear there will be a deluge of demand for healthcare for other issues. There have been stories in the press of delays to cancer and other important treatments, and these will need to be prioritised. Will mental health be at the back of the queue? I suspect it will, as that is usually where it is. That would, to my mind, be a tragic mistake. Look back at those survey results: how will the isolation of working from home – or being ‘let go’ – during lockdowns have impacted them? Somehow, I doubt there will be an improvement. And with all the other issues which will have arisen during lockdown I wouldn’t be at all surprised if there was a huge increase in the number of people needing mental health treatments. Services have been under great pressure for years, and I don’t think they will be able to cope. This will cause a knock-on effect, a kind of vicious circle, storing up further needs for the future.

I said in my previous piece that a widespread programme of education was needed, and I think that is even more relevant now. The recent news that the government was no longer going to provide funding for the Time To Change (TTC) organisation is a retrograde step: TTC has provided much-needed programmes of education about combatting the stigma attached to mental health, and I doubt that other organisations, such as Mind, will be able to fill the gap, on top of everything else they already do. The future isn’t looking good, in my view.

You Go To School

The ever reliable Timehop reminded me this morning of a piece I wrote seven years ago today, when I was two weeks away from retirement. It was a fairly short one, but it resonated with me when I read it again so I thought I’d share it for you – after all, how many of you were reading my blog seven years ago and will have seen this before?!

A few things struck me:

1. Those were the days when (a) WordPress offered us a Daily Prompt, and (b) they were helpful.

2. The link to WordPress’ Daily Prompt still works! You’ll have to scroll a long way down the 216 contributions to find mine though, back in the days when this still went by the original, albeit not very original, title of “Clive’s Blog.’

3. I used to listen to my music on an iPod back then – remember them? Just think how much streaming services have rendered them obsolete in seven years, saving us the task of copying our CDs and transferring them! I think mine is tucked away in a drawer somewhere, long since left silent.

4. This will be the second time this week that I’ve shared a Steve Earle song – because he’s worth it!

5. Sadly, I don’t see the point I made about the lack of availability of education for all becoming less valid any time soon.

This is what I said back then:

YOU GO TO SCHOOL AND YOU LEARN TO READ AND WRITE

Daily Prompt: Can’t Drive 55

I haven’t posted for one of the daily prompts for a while – or anything else, come to that – but I was rather taken with the challenge in today’s, which reads:

Take the third line of the last song you heard, make it your post title, and write for a maximum of 15 minutes. GO!

As I’ve been fighting headaches and a migraine all week I haven’t listened to any music since last weekend, so I had to check on my iPod what that last song was. It turned out to be this:

As I’ve mentioned before I am a long time fan of Steve Earle, and this song comes from his first full-length studio album, Guitar Town, which was released in 1986. The third line of the song goes:

You go to school and you learn to read and write

A fairly basic statement, until you hear it in the context of the song, which is about the frustrations of a young man growing up in a small town wanting to get away to see ‘what’s over that rainbow.’ The next line is:

So you can walk into the County Bank and sign away your life

Get the picture? The song is really a mix of those frustrations with hope that the future will be better, all based on the belief of youth that the world is a much better place everywhere except in the small cocoon that encloses them. I know, I was young once, and my memory hasn’t completely gone. Yet. As I approach a major change in my life it does in some strange way feel like I’m a teenager again, with so much to look forward to. The big difference is that I’m not dreaming about what my life may hold and what I may make of it, but how I can spend my time enjoying myself, doing all the things I’ve wanted to do but haven’t yet done, and hopefully still making a useful contribution to society in my own small way. That’s a kind of dream, isn’t it? To my mind, there’s nothing wrong with having dreams at any time about what life may hold for you – being without some hope is like giving up on life, which is not something I’m planning on doing any time soon!

But let’s go back to the song line that started off my thoughts. At its most basic level it is a simple statement of fact: everyone goes to school, and reading and writing are the basis of all forms of learning. All of you reading this must have gone through some schooling to be able to be here now. But I know that people read this blog from a huge number of countries worldwide, not all of which have such a developed education system as the USA and the UK, where the bulk of readers come from. We take education as a right, as a given part of our lives. My education has taken me to university, to a Masters degree, and supported me through my working life. I have been able to read anything I wanted to along the way – even if I still have to look up the big words in a dictionary from time to time. I’ve always seen this as an entirely natural thing, and the opportunity to have a good education should be a given for everyone, regardless of where they are born. Unfortunately, even in the 21st century, that is still not the case everywhere. Maybe, when we sit and think about our frustrations with life, with our dreams of something better, we should also think how lucky we are to do that – not everyone even knows the rainbow exists and that there might be a better place beyond it.

A final thought: the song that started this off has been covered several times. I’ll leave you with my favourite of these, with the beautiful voices of Shawn Colvin and, providing harmonies, her great pal Mary Chapin Carpenter:

American Pi(e) Day

As every schoolkid should know, the fattest knight at King Arthur’s Round Table was Sir Cumference. He got that way from too much pi.

Or maybe not.

Readers of longer standing may recall that I used to post occasional Dates To Note and originally ran a version of this post in that series two years ago. I rather like this one, as it gives us Brits a chance to marvel at how weird the USA can be so, for newer readers, here’s a reworked version.

In the UK last week was British Pie Week, whilst in the USA 14 March is National Pi Day. Being a good British citizen of proportions that make me the answer to the football fans’ chanted question ‘Who ate all the pies?’ I was naturally drawn to this. However on further investigation I found that it was in fact a ‘celebration’ by Jus-Rol who make…yes, you guessed it…pastry. I felt rather let down by that, as we have such a tradition of pie-making in this country that it deserves better than blatant commercialism. Oh well!

It was actually the fact that the Americans thought that Pi was worthy of a whole day to itself that caught my attention. My mind was suddenly full of images of those guys who used to present the Open University maths progammes in the 80s – wild hair, wild eyes, outrageous shirts and strange knitwear – gathering together (in circles, of course) chanting strange incantations to the mythical aspects of a mathematical constant, whatever they may be. In case you’re like me and school was a long time ago – or you didn’t listen – the definition of Pi given on the website is:

“Pi Day is celebrated on March 14th (3/14) around the world. Pi (Greek letter “π”) is the symbol used in mathematics to represent a constant — the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter — which is approximately 3.14159.”

I’m not sure about the claims of worldwide celebration, to be honest. For a start, I don’t know how many countries use the short form calendar backwards to make the 3/14 link possible. Sorry, American readers, but it’s just illogical to put it that way round: days become months, months become years, so it makes more sense to me that today is 14/3/17. Having got that mini rant off my chest, I guess there must be geeks all over the world who would welcome the opportunity to celebrate a concept. But how do you do it? And why? And how did it all begin?

As usual, I turned to the fount of all knowledge, i.e. Wikipedia. You can read the whole article here, but in summary the day was first marked by a physicist called Larry Shaw in San Francisco, in 1988. Heeeeere’s Larry:

The pi(e)man

What did I say about 1980s mathematicians! There are apparently some educational aspects that make this a day worth giving some attention, such as the competitions in schools to see who can recall Pi to the most decimal places. I’m sure that will be helpful in your future career, kids! But even the instigator of the concept made the link to PIE rather than PI, as you can see from his photo. Yes, they eat pies to mark the day. Apparently they also throw them, but that just seems sacrilegious! I was also intrigued to discover that as 14/3 is also Einstein’s birthday, Princeton, where he lived for 20 years, hold an Einstein look-alike contest on the day. Give up, guys, I’ve got it covered from my one and only attempt at taking part in Movember:

Me and Albert. Or vice versa.

Clearly, Pi Day is a big thing in the States, as even Google has in the past got in on the act:

That’s about as confusing to me as the idea of celebrating a concept, if I’m honest. But if you have a moment do take a look at the Pi Day website. You’ll learn more about Pi than you can ever have imagined (or wanted). I love the tab given over to ‘Pi Sightings’ and especially the Pi Pie Pan, which you can see at the head of this post. Maths becomes fun at last! Well, almost. And if you want to know the history of Pi, it is encapsulated in this little ditty:

Whoever thought mathematicians could be so amusing, eh? I think I’ll stick with Don McLean’s original, thanks. But definitely not the Madonna abomination:

Happy Pi-ing, USA! We think you’re strange 😂